Visual Impairment More Common in Minority Youth

Race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are closely associated with visual impairments in adolescents in the United States, researchers have found. The study showed that adolescents who identified as Black, Mexican-American, of low-income, or as non-US citizens were two to three times more likely than White adolescents to report vision problems and to perform worse on … Read more

Sleep Loss Linked to Reduced Generosity, Even at a Neuronal Level

Sleep loss, ranging from the individual level of missing a night’s sleep to a societal level of losing an hour’s sleep because of Daylight Saving Time, is associated with reduced altruism or an inclination to help others, new research suggests. These effects were observed even at the neurologic level on brain MRIs, investigators report. “In … Read more

Subtle Visual Dysfunctions Often Precede Early-Stage Psychosis

Subtle subjective visual dysfunctions (VisDys) are common and are associated with poorer outcomes of patients with schizophrenia and recent-onset psychosis or who are at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis, new research suggests. A multinational group of investigators found that said Vis-more often by patients with recent onset psychosis and CHR than by those with … Read more

ECT Tied to Reduction in All-Cause Mortality in Major Depression

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may lower mortality for patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD), new research suggests. In an analysis of data from a large database of inpatients across the United States, use of ECT for those with resistant MDD was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality compared with those who did not receive ECT. … Read more

Substance Use the Main Cause of Physician License Actions: Study

Actions taken against a physician’s license for substance use are more common than those for psychological impairment or actions related to physical health, according to a recent report. Despite a sharp uptick in 2011, substance use–specific license actions taken against physicians dropped in frequency between 2004 and 2020. More than three fourths (76.3%) of license … Read more

Refugees’ High Burden of Chronic Pain Tied to Mental Illness

The covered study in this summary was published in researchsquare.com and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaways The study found a high burden of chronic pain in Syrian adults refugees in Norway that has adverse consequences towards their daily workers. Anxiety, depression, and PTSD are associated with higher levels of chronic pain in … Read more

A Computerized Test May Help Detect Cognitive Impairment

The study covered in this summary was published on researchsquare.com as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaways The Loewenstein-Acevedo Scales for Semantic Interference and Learning, Brief Computerized Version (LASSI-BC) measured early cognitive change in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and was able to differentiate between cognitively unimpaired (CU) and amnestic … Read more

Do Psychotropic Meds Raise or Lower COVID Risk?

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Different psychotropic medications are associated with different risks of COVID-19 in hospitalized patients with serious mental illness, a new study suggests. Investigators found that second-generation antipsychotics were associated with a 48% lower risk of COVID-19, while valproic acid was associated with … Read more

A Real, but Overlooked Syndrome

When an individual develops a terminal illness, those closest to them often start to grieve long before the person dies. Although a common syndrome, it often goes unrecognized and unaddressed. A new review proposes a way of defining this specific type of grief in the hope that better, more precise descriptive categories will inform therapeutic … Read more

Neurocognitive Sequelae of COVID-19 After Acute Infection

The study covered in this summary was published in medRxiv.org as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaways The burden of self-reported post-acute symptoms and possible sequelae, particularly fatigue and neurocognitive impairment, remains significant 6 to 12 months after acute, even among young and middle-aged adults after mild acute SARS-CoV-2 infection, … Read more