Motor Impairment Indicators Shown in Children With Autism

Brain indicators of motor impairment were distinct among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and controls, in a new study. Previous research suggests that individuals with ASD overlap in motor impairment with those with DCD. But these two conditions may differ significantly in some areas, as children with ASD … Read more

More Evidence Insomnia Contributes to Cognitive Decline

A new study provides more evidence that insomnia may contribute to cognitive decline in older adults and shows that difficulty falling asleep in midlife may be most indicative of future cognitive impairment. Investigators found that having trouble falling asleep most nights (vs rarely/never) was equivalent to the effect of 2 to 3 years of aging … Read more

Recommending Exercise for Migraine: Just Do It

Strength training is the most effective form of exercise for reducing migraine, with high-intensity aerobics coming in second, and both beating top-line migraine medications topiramate and amitriptyline, new research suggests. The new results should encourage clinicians to recommend patients with migraine engage in strength-training exercise whenever possible, study author Yohannes W. Woldeamanuel, MD, a physician-scientist … Read more

Imaging IDs Brain Activity Related to Dissociative Symptoms

Trauma-related dissociation consists of several subtypes, with unique brain signatures depending on the type of dissociative disorders, new research suggests. Results from a neuroimaging study showed that different dissociative symptoms were linked to hyperconnectivity within several key regions of the brain, including the central executive, default, and salience networks, and decreased connectivity of the central … Read more

Chronic Pain Tied to Poor Health, Increased COVID Risk

Individuals who have chronic pain at age 44 are more likely to report poor general health, poor mental health, and joblessness when they are in their 50s and 60s, new research shows. Chronic pain at age 44 (in 2002) was also predictive of SARS-CoV-2 infection nearly two decades later, in 2021. “We speculate that pain … Read more

Brain Imaging Validates Cognitive Problems After Lyme Disease

New imaging data show distinctive brain changes that appear to explain memory and cognitive problems following Lyme disease. Using fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques, investigators found changes in white matter and other brain tissues in patients with posttreatment Lyme disease (PTLD) in comparison with healthy control persons who did not have a history … Read more

EEG Backs Near-Death Experience During CPR

Brain wave recordings obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) offer support to near-death experiences subjectively reported by some people who survive cardiac arrest, according to a novel new study. “These recalled experiences and brain wave changes may be the first signs of the so-called ‘near-death’ experience, and we have captured them for the first time in … Read more

Major Depression Treatments Boost Brain Connectivity

VIENNA — Inpatient treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) can lead to brain connectivity increases that are associated with degree of symptom improvement, new research suggests. In a “repeat” MRI study, adult participants with MDD had significantly lower brain connectivity compared with their healthy peers at baseline — but showed significant improvement at the 6-week … Read more

Nicotine Blocks Estrogen Production in Women’s Brains

The production of estrogen in the thalamus appears to be curtailed by just one dose of nicotine, equivalent to that in a cigarette, reveals a whole brain analysis of healthy women in the first study of its kind. The findings were presented at the 35th European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) Congress. The researchers performed both … Read more

Cognition-Boosting ‘Smart Drugs’ Not So Smart for Healthy People

VIENNA, Austria — Prescription drugs designed to boost cognition in neurodevelopmental disorders do not increase overall cognitive performance in healthy individuals — and may even reduce productivity, new research suggests. In a randomized controlled trial, 40 healthy adults were given the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatments methylphenidate or dexamphetamine or the wakefulness-promoting drug modafinil vs placebo. … Read more