Motor Impairment Indicators Shown in Children With Autism

Brain indicators of motor impairment were distinct among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and controls, in a new study. Previous research suggests that individuals with ASD overlap in motor impairment with those with DCD. But these two conditions may differ significantly in some areas, as children with ASD … Read more

Intermittent Fasting Diet Trend Linked to Disordered Eating

Intermittent fasting (IF), defined as fasting for more than eight hours at a time, is a trend that is growing in popularity. Yet new research shows it may be linked to eating disorder (ED) behaviors. Researchers from the University of Toronto analyzed data from more than 2,700 adolescents and young adults from the Canadian Study … Read more

The Importance of the Need for Hope

After the 1995 bombing in Oklahoma City, the search and rescue response included specially trained cadaver dogs. Their job was to help detect and retrieve the missing. With each discovery, the dogs initial excitement quickly vanished, and the person was found to not have survived the incident. Hours turned into days of pulling human remains … Read more

Mental Illness Tied to More Healthcare Use Among Homeless

Among adults experiencing homelessness in Ontario, Canada, those with a mental illness are more likely to use emergency, inpatient, and physician services, according to a new report. In general, homelessness is associated with higher healthcare needs, hospitalizations, and primary care appointments, compared with low-income control groups, the study authors wrote. At the same time, healthcare … Read more

Single Dose of Psilocybin for Major Depression Tied to Short-Term Remission

A single 25 mg dose of synthetic psilocybin in combination with psychotherapy appears to effectively ease symptoms of treatment-resistant depression (TRD) — at least in the short-term, new research shows. In the largest study of psilocybin for TRD to-date, results of the phase 2b randomized, double-blind trial show participants in the 25-mg dose group experienced … Read more

Impaired Communication May Predict Coercive Psychiatric Care

Psychiatric patients with impaired communication abilities were significantly more likely to be admitted involuntarily to inpatient care and to experience coercive measures after admission, based on data from more than 1,500 individuals. Celline Cole Despite improvements in reducing coercive measures in psychiatric inpatient care, both involuntary admission and coercive measures remain in use in many … Read more

Four Commonly Abused Drugs Linked With Atrial Fibrillation

Cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and cannabis may independently increase the risk of atrial fibrillation (AFib), based on data from almost 24 million people. While more work is needed to uncover causal links, physicians should be aware that these commonly abused substances could be driving new cases of AFib, reported investigators from the University of California, San … Read more

Menopause an Independent Risk Factor for Schizophrenia Relapse?

Menopause appears to be an independent risk factor for relapse in women with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs), new research suggests. Investigators studied a cohort of close to 62,000 people with SSDs, stratifying individuals by sex and age, and found that starting between the ages of 45 and 50 years — when the menopausal transition is … Read more

Youth Killed by Guns in US Equals Classroom a Day

The number of children and teens who die from gun violence in the United States on a given day could fill a typical high school classroom, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Preventing accident-related injuries and deaths in children and youth “demands a public safety approach like regulation of motor vehicles,” the group … Read more

First Known Opiate Biomarker Shows Fentanyl’s Effect on Brain

Fentanyl depresses breathing about 4 minutes before symptoms of distress are evident at a dose that is 1700 times lower than that needed for sedation, new research shows. This new information comes after researchers identified a unique EEG signature produced by fentanyl, the first known biomarker of an opiate’s effect on the brain. By monitoring … Read more